Stephen Smyth calls for job stability for workers at Anglo

The Miners’ Union has slammed Anglo American’s short-term approach to its Dawson coal operations which put mineworkers and their families in a financial perplexity.

Coal mine Image credit: flickr.com User: Elgindale
Coal mine Image credit: flickr.com User: Elgindale

The CFMEU has called for greater stability for its member working at Anglo’s mines following the company’s dismissal of over 200 mine workers in order to alleviate production costs, which have spiraled out of control at the height of the boom.

According to a media report featured on CFMEU, Queensland District President Stephen Smyth said the families of mine workers deserved more stability in their workplace after delivering productivity increase which has seen the company bank a hefty $4.7 billion profit.

“We will be writing to Anglo American to call for the company to provide greater employment stability to all mine workers at its operations across Central Queensland,” Mr. Smyth said.

“Like many multinationals operating in the Bowen Basin, Anglo has demanded more from its mine workers to make up for management allowing production costs to get out of control at the height of the boom.”

“To make up for this, Anglo has demanded greater productivity and increased production from its employees and they have delivered.”

“Mining communities like Moura should not then bear the brunt of Anglo’s short-term approach to job stability.”

“Anglo is gearing up for its Bowen Basin operations to become very profitable operations in the long term. Stability for its Central Queensland workforce should be a part of this long-term strategy.”

According to him, if a company in any other industry was to employ the strategy of hiring and firing workers on such short-term basis, there would be public uproar.

Mr. Smyth said that workers in Central Queensland mining communities deserved job stability after having been integral in helping their employers to a $4.7 billion profits.

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